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AUD to INR Forecast

A decrease in AUD/INR is expected in 2020, and that's bad news for Indian expat workers, who represent one of the largest groups remitting money from Australia.

Australian dollar to Indian rupee bank forecasts

The results of a poll of 50 analysts taken mid-year suggest the rupee will weaken less than the Australian dollar in the second half of 2019, and imply AUD/INR rates near 47.0 at year-end — a level not seen since early 2016.


AUD/INR - 90 day trend
ALERT:90-DAY HIGHS |
AUD/INR at 50.36 was trading 5.2% above AVG:47.87 with LO:43.12 and HI:50.36 (90 days). ALERT: AUD/INR rose to 90-DAY HIGHS.

Note that forecasts and predictions for the AUD/INR exchange rate change all the time, affected by news events and relative sentiment towards the Australian and Indian and this exchange rate is even more volatile than usual because of the uncertainties around the Coronavirus pandemic.

You can read more about AUD cross-rate forecasts here AUD Trends and Forecasts for 2020.

What is a good AUD to INR exchange rate?

This is a difficult question and the answer really depends on many factors. The best way to consider an exchange rate's relative value is to look at the rate's history.

The following table looks at the change in the AUD to INR exchange rate to the present day for periods going back upto 10 years:

 
AUD/INRPeriod to 29-MayDateRate
1.4% ▲1 Week22 May 202049.6704
2.1% ▲30 Days29 Apr 202049.3328
7.2% ▲90 Days29 Feb 202046.9764
4.6% ▲1 Year30 May 201948.1526
3.3% ▲5 Years31 May 201548.7285
28% ▲10 Years01 Jun 201039.3338
AUD/INR 10 year rates & changes to 29-May-2020 (50.3532)

AUD Info and Influences

The Australian dollar is the fifth most traded currency in the world and is popular with currency traders, because of the high interest rates in Australia, the freedom of the foreign exchange market from government intervention, the stability of Australia's economy and political system, and the view that the Australian dollar offers diversification benefits in a portfolio containing the major world currencies, especially because of its greater exposure to Asian economies and the commodities cycle.

The currency is commonly referred to by foreign-exchange traders as the "Aussie dollar".

INR Info and Influences

The Indian rupee gets its name from the rupiya – a silver coin first produced in the sixteenth century.

Rupee trades make up around 1% of the total volume of the foreign exchange market. This market share is comparable to currencies from other major emerging market economies, such as South Africa, Brazil and Russia, but falls some way short of the 4% share taken by the Chinese yuan – the most actively traded emerging market currency.

When is the Indian Rupee stronger or weaker?

Importantly, the rupee has strong seasonal characteristics. The currency typically falls in value every second-quarter (April-to-June) due to India’s heightened gold demand heading into the Hindu festival of Akshaya Tritiya. Heavy rains between June and September can also depress industrial production in the country and weaken exports, which weigh on the currency.

What are the rupee’s all-time highs and lows?

The rupee’s all-time low against the US dollar came in February 2016 when USD/INR reached 68.80 (INR/USD 0.0145). It's all-time high came in March 1973 when USD/INR traded at just 7.19 (INR/USD 0.139). More recently, since 2007, the rupee was at its strongest in November 2007 when USD/INR fell to 39.10 (INR/USD 0.0256).

Which Indian banknotes were cancelled in 2016?

On 8 November 2016, the Government of India announced the demonetisation of all ₹500 and ₹1000 banknotes of the Mahatma Gandhi Series. The cancelled ₹500 and ₹1000 notes are no longer exchangeable at any bank in India: they have since March 2017 effectively lost all monetary value.

In addition to the 500 and 1000 rupees, the Mumbai-based Reserve Bank of India has decided to withdraw all pre-2005 Indian Rupee notes. These discontinued Rupee bills have no year of issue printed on the back side. These Indian rupees without date on the back are no longer a valid means of payment in India or Bhutan.

Is Indian currency accepted in Bhutan?

Bhutan’s unit of currency is called the Bhutanese Ngultrum (BTN). A Ngultrum has the same value as the Indian rupee, the rupee is also legal in Bhutan.

INR 100 & 50 Rupee denomination may be used in Bhutan, but Ngultrum cannot be used in India. Indian Rupee denomination note of INR 500, INR 1000 and INR 2000 are not accepted in Bhutan.

 
Please note that the opinions of our authors are their own and do not reflect the opinion of Best Exchange Rates and should not be taken as a reference to buy or sell any financial product.
 
 

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