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    Currency in San Marino

    A practical currency and money guide to travel, living and doing business in San Marino and the Euro (EUR).

     

    What currency is used in San Marino?

    The official currency of San Marino (country code: SM) is the euro, with symbol and currency code EUR.

    Things to know about the euro

    The euro (ISO: EUR) is involved in slightly more than 30% of all foreign exchange deals, and as such, is the world’s second most traded currency, behind the US dollar.

    The euro is the currency of the eurozone (officially called the ‘euro area’), which consists of 19 of the 28 member states of the European Union, and is used by almost 350 million Europeans. It was introduced in January 1999.

    Of all the thousands of exchange rates that exist in the world, the euro-to-US dollar exchange rate is the most actively traded, or most ‘liquid’.

    Since its introduction, the euro’s lowest value against the dollar came in October 2000 when EUR/USD hit lows of 0.8231. The currency was strongest in July 2008, shortly before the worst stage of the 2007-2009 financial crisis, when EUR/USD reached 1.6038.

    There are currently more than twenty nations and territories which peg their currencies to the euro, the largest of which is Denmark.

    The euro banknotes and coins

    The Euro is issued in banknotes of €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, and €500, and in coins of 1 cent, 2 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 50 cents, €1, and €2.

    The banknotes feature images of historical and cultural figures from across the European Union, while the coins depict each member country's unique design. The design of the Euro banknotes and coins is intended to be easily identifiable and difficult to counterfeit.

    An example euro banknote

     

    Travel Ideas and Money Tips for San Marino

    The Most Serene Republic of San Marino is a must-see destination for lovers of history—and for those who love picturesque panoramas. A sole survivor of Italy's once powerful city-state network, this landlocked micronation clung on long after the more powerful kingdoms of Genoa and Venice folded. And still it clings, secure in its status as the world's oldest surviving sovereign state and its oldest republic (since AD 301). San Marino also enjoys one of the planet's highest GDP per capita.

    San Marino is a mountainous microstate surrounded by north-central Italy. Among the world’s oldest republics, it retains much of its historic architecture. On the slopes of Monte Titano sits the capital, also called San Marino, known for its medieval walled old town and narrow cobblestone streets. The Three Towers, castlelike citadels dating to the 11th century, sit atop Titano’s neighboring peaks.

    What currency should I use in San Marino?

    San Marino uses the euro and has a well-developed banking network. You should have no problem finding an ATM - which might also be marked up with the word Bankomat - in the cities in this tiny country. However, if you’re headed off the beaten track, then carry cash. ATMs can be found in bank branches, in shopping centres and near supermarkets. Find the most convenient location for you, using one of the following ATM locators from national and regional banks.

    How to get around in San Marino?

    Whether as a day trip or weekend getaway, San Marino is easily reached from central Italian cities like Rimini (30 mins), Bologna (1.5 hours) and Florence (2.5 hours) by bus or rental car. Hopping over from Italy to San Marino is quite easy: There is no border control, so you don’t need your passport to enter… but you can ask for a stamp in the tourist department as a souvenir! The local currency is the Euro and the official language is Italian, although most shops and restaurants speak English.

    Bonelli Bus and Benedettini operate 12 buses daily to/from Rimini (one-way €5, 50 minutes), arriving at Piazzale Calcigni. The SS72 leads up from Rimini. Leave your car at one of Città di San Marino's numerous car parks and walk up to the centro storico. Alternatively, park at car park 11 and take the funivia. In the opposite direction, the funavia leaves from next to the tourist office.

    The view of San Marino.

    There’s no internal rail system and local bus services are limited. It is worth noting, if you’re staying in a Sammarinese hotel, you are entitled to a discount on local bus fares (though not on the crossborder service to Rimini, Italy). Cars are banned in the historic centre of the capital.

    Travel tips for San Marino.

    Città di San Marino's highlights are its spectacular views, its Unesco-listed streets, and a stash of rather bizarre museums dedicated to vampires, torture, wax dummies and strange facts (pick up a list in the tourist office). Ever popular in summertime is the hourly changing of the guard in Piazza della Libertà. A Multimuseo card (€10) is a good bargain for entrance to all of the state museums.

    San Marino has a Mediterranean climate with warm summers moderated by sea breezes. However, in summer the streets are clogged with visitors, especially on the weekends. In winter, the republic’s high altitude (it is built on the Apennine range) ensures it sees a sprinkling of snow. Visit on 9 September and you will be treated to a crossbow tournament held to celebrate the anniversary of the republic’s foundation. The Mille Miglia classic car rally from Brescia to Rome usually goes through San Marino in mid-May.

    The historic streets of San Marino.

     

     

    Expat Money & Business Guide to San Marino

     

    Managing your finances in San Marino

    Here we list some key points for expats and businesses to consider when managing financial dealings in San Marino:

    1. Understand Euro currency exchange rates: Exchange rates can have a big impact on your finances, so it is important to keep an eye on the EUR exchange rate and consider using a currency exchange service or a credit card that does not charge foreign transaction fees to get the best exchange rate.

    2. Use a local Euro bank account: A local EUR bank account can make it easier for you to manage your finances and pay bills while you are in San Marino. It may also be more convenient to use a local EUR bank account to make purchases and withdraw cash.

    3. Research local laws and regulations: It is important to understand the local laws and regulations that apply to financial transactions in San Marino. This can help you avoid legal issues and ensure that you are complying with local requirements.

    4. Consider the tax implications: It is important to understand the tax implications of living or doing business in San Marino. This can help you plan your finances and ensure that you are paying the correct amount of tax.

    5. Seek financial advice: If you are unsure of how to manage your finances in San Marino, it is a good idea to seek the advice of a financial professional who is familiar with the local financial system. This can help you make informed decisions and avoid financial pitfalls.

     

    EUR/USD – Market Data

    The exchange rate of euro (EUR), or the amount of EUR that can be exchanged for a foreign currency, can fluctuate rapidly based on a number of factors, including economic conditions, interest rates, and political events. Below you can check the latest EUR/USD rate plus recent trend, chart, forecasts and historic rates.

    1 EUR = 1.0731 USD
    Sell EUR  →  Buy USD
    EUR to USD is at 60-day lows near 1.0729, 1.1% below its 3-month average of 1.085, having traded in a relatively stable 6.3% range from 1.0545 to 1.1211
    |
      1 USD = 0.9319 EUR
     
    EURUSD :
    60-DAYLOW1d
     

    DateEUR/USDChangePeriod
    12 May 2023
    1.0940
    1.9% 2 Week
    25 Feb 2023
    1.0573
    1.5% 3 Month
    26 May 2022
    1.0733
    0% 1 Year
    27 May 2018
    1.1689
    8.2% 5 Year
    28 May 2013
    1.2867
    16.6% 10 Year
    31 May 2003
    1.1800
    9.1% 20 Year
    EUR/USD historic rates & change to 26-May-2023

     

     

    What are EUR to USD forecasts?

    The EUR to USD exchange rate has been trading in a relatively stable range over the past three months, hovering near 60-day lows of 1.0724. Recently, EUR's negative correlation with a stronger US Dollar put some pressure on the single currency, while a weaker-than-expected consumer confidence reading also dented demand for EUR. The US Dollar has made modest gains over the past few days as a bearish market mood increased the safe-haven currency's appeal amid increasing Sino-American economic tensions.

    FX analysts expect that if the Eurozone's PMIs raise concerns about weakening private sector activity, then the single currency could face headwinds. Moreover, the overall performance of the Eurozone economy is a significant factor that affects the euro exchange rate, and economists believe that uncertainty over the European Central Bank's interest rate plans could further impact the EUR to USD exchange rate adversely. However, the US dollar's strength over the past year is expected to eventually reverse in 2023 as the Fed's interest rate hikes cycle finally comes to an end.

    EUR/USD forecasts EUR/USD rates

     

    Compare Euro Exchange Rates & Fees

    The below comparison table makes it easy to find the best exchange rates and lowest fees when you want to make an International Money Transfer to San Marino or planning a trip or maybe living there, so will need to exchange and spend Euro.

    Loading comparison rates...

     
       
       
       
       
     

    It is important to note that the exchange rate of the euro can change rapidly and that past performance is not necessarily indicative of future performance. It is advisable to carefully consider the risks and factors that may affect EUR exchange rates before making any financial decisions.

      

    The Euro is also the domestic currency in 33 other countries.

     

     

     

     

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